From funding grassroots projects to donating profits to charity, the brands we carry have a bigger mission dedicated to the environment.

Patagonia is not only known for creating quality products that last a lifetime, but for pushing the industry to be better. Whether it’s through more sustainable practices, their 1% for the Planet organization, or a protest for the protection and preservation of our environment. One of the biggest is their 1% for the Planet campaign that gives 1% of sales to support environmental organizations around the world. This program funds at the grassroots level in countries and communities where they have people on the ground. Since 1985, Patagonia has pledged 1% of sales to the preservation and restoration of the natural environment. In 2002, founder of Patagonia, Yvon Chouinard, and Craig Mathews, owner of Blue Ribbon Flies, went one step further creating a non-profit corporation to encourage other businesses to do the same through 1% for the Planet.

Another brand striving to create meaningful change is Toad&Co, with a mission to focus on socially and environmentally smart business, while inspiring people to live their fullest lives. As part of the Conservation Alliance since 2005, they support grassroots organizations working to protect wild places. Every year organizations receive grants that allow environmental groups to continue playing key roles in protecting rivers, trails, wildlands and climbing areas throughout North America.

Since beginning in 1989, the Conservation Alliance has contributed almost $15 million to grassroots conservation groups. The results of their funding has helped save more than 45 million acres of wildlands, protect 2,972 miles of rivers, remove 28 dams, designate 5 marine reserves, and 11 climbing areas. That’s a feat we are proud to support.

One of our newest brands, Parks Project, contributes directly to one of over 30 different conservancies across the USA, providing vital funding for the ongoing care of National Parks. Whether it’s supporting bear conservation in Denali or trail restorations in Muir Woods, Parks Project makes quality goods with purpose to fund and promote projects that restore our nation's parks.

It is just the beginning for this company and over the past year alone they’ve contributed hundreds of volunteer hours and influenced how hundreds of thousands of people look at their relationship with the outdoors. They see the big picture with a ten-year goal of funding 100 projects and generating 100,000 volunteer hours while reinvigorating passion for our parks.

Whether you are actively working to protect and preserve the environment or you support companies that do, you are part of something much bigger. So, spend Earth Day celebrating your love for the outdoors and the beauty that surrounds us on a daily basis. Share your adventures by tagging us @apexoutfitter #notyouraverageoutfitter!

Chaco: Fit For Adventure

Born on the river in 1989, Chaco began with a simple idea from a Colorado rafting guide. What if a sandal was created with webbing straps that passed through the midsole to create a custom fit sandal that stays put no matter what the adventure was. The idea caught on once the Z shaped straps became what explorers always hoped for - a secure, comfortable piece of footwear that could take them anywhere. Chaco has come a long way since ‘89, but they have always stayed faithful to what made their “Z” sandal so amazing in the first place; simple designs, durable construction, and all day comfort and support.  

With a heritage rooted in offering simple, versatile products that focus on superior comfort and durability, Chaco believes that outdoor adventure, travel, and community enrich the lives of their customers and celebrate the journey through their community, Chaco Nation. So, find your perfect fit for adventure below and join #ChacoNation in the pursuit of the greatest adventures.

Always a Classic: Built to Last
Chaco classic Z’s found at Apex Outfitter are made with durable polyurethane (PU) that doesn’t compress over time, keeping your sandals on your feet longer. Supportive and dependable, like an old friend, Chaco’s LUVSEAT footbed promoted healthy alignment and arch support for all day wear. Newly updated with ChacoGrip rubber, the classic Z’s are the best performing Chaco outsole yet.

Step into the Clouds
Experience the Classic Z with an added layer of instant pillow top comfort. The new Cloud collection from Chaco merges the Classic Z performance with enhanced comfort by introducing their travel ready Z/Cloud series. Featuring the same custom adjustable strap system, performance ChacoGrip rubber outsole, and a top layer of ultra-soft polyurethane for instant cushion underfoot. Step in and feel the difference. Available for both Men and Women in store and online at Apex Outfitter.

Technology Behind LUVSEAT
Supportive and durable, the Luvseat fit promotes healthy alignment and arch support providing an all day wear. Built into every pair of Chaco’s, the Luvseat design provides contoured arch support in a product so dependable, every single style is certified by the American Podiatric Medical Association. The APMA Seal identifies products of exceptional quality that are manufactured with comfort, health, and safety in mind. The 100 year old organization supports the estimated 15,000 podiatrists in the U.S. and their certification signifies footwear with a properly supported and comfortable stride. So take it from them and give your feet the support they need with the Luvseat Footbed from Chaco.

More Tech: More Grip
With Chaco’s commitment to providing the best adventure sandal on the planet, they have continued to evolve their technology with new innovative designs and materials. Cue: ChacoGrip. Designed in house and extensively field-tested across various wilderness scenarios, ChacoGrip marks the next generation of Chaco performance. This new innovation allows users to adventure more miles with more DURABILITY and GRIP than ever before. Whether you are heading to Eno River in Durham, NC or on a Jamaican excursion. ChacoGrip results proved 40% better in wet condition and twice as effective in slimy conditions against all previous Chaco outsole iterations. What does that mean for you? A more reliable and durable sandal than ever before.

Chaco hiking sandals provide function and support for all your outdoor adventures. Plus, with a variety of styles, colors, and fits, you’ll find the perfect footwear for any occasion. So, get ready for water, trail, and everything in between with Chaco sandals that are fit for every adventure. Shop in store and online here: https://www.shopapexoutfitter.com/collections/chaco

The biggest step we can all take to reduce our impact is to do more with what we have, and what’s better than a company who focuses on repairing your favorite pieces to wear even longer?

At Patagonia, they work hard to make high–quality, responsibly sourced clothing that lasts for years and can be repaired — and they guarantee it for life. Yep, that’s right, for life. They believe in making quality products and giving them the longest life possible. The Worn Wear program celebrates the stories we wear, keeps your gear in action longer and provides an easy way to recycle Patagonia garments when they’re beyond repair. When that first bit of sharp rock finally bites into your favorite jacket, don’t worry, they’ve got your back. Patagonia employs 46 full-time repair technicians at our service center in Reno, Nevada. It’s the largest repair facility in North America—completing about 44,000 repairs per year. It might be hard to part with that favorite Patagonia jacket or pant, but a quick trip out west and they will fix it in no time.

Laundering, ironing, and drying can shorten the life of your clothes as much as wearing them does, so Patagonia offer tips for cleaning and care to extend the life of your clothing - found on our blog here: http://www.apexoutfitter.com/patagonia-care.

Do you have a piece that has seen better days? Whatever you’ve bought from Patagonia that’s finally worn-out, you can return to Patagonia so that they can recycle it into new fiber or fabric (or repurpose what can’t yet be recycled).  Because everything natural gives life to something new, so should the things we make.

Patagonia believes as individual consumers, the single best thing we can do for the planet is to keep our stuff in use longer and that’s what Patagonia’s Worn Wear Program and Iron Clad Guarantee are all about. For more information check out Patagonia.com, or stop by the store and ask our staff about Patagonia’s Worn Wear program.



Some exclusions do apply, so check out their website for details as well as below:

Repairs / Returns Requirements

Patagonia requires authorization on all warranty related returns and repair. You can call Patagonia Customer Service at 1 (800) 638-6464 or if you purchased the product from us stop by or call 919-267-9353 to obtain an authorization prior to shipping back to Patagonia. Allow 4-6 weeks for repairs, replacements are subject to wholesale availability.

Repairs Exceptions: Repairs cannot be made to Boxers, Baggies, Wool or Capilene Daily, Lightweight & Midweight Baselayers. Capilene Daily, Lightweight & Midweight are not cost-effective to repair.

Bottom zipper on wheeled luggage • Zippers directly next to a hard section on a piece of luggage cannot be repaired; most other zippers can be done.

Trucker Hats & Gloves • They don't repair or replace the plastic strap at the back of hats. It is not cost-effective and the plastic strap is not a trim they stock. • Gloves are time-consuming and difficult to repair. They will not repair them unless it is simple.

Delaminated Items • They cannot re-seal or re-laminate fabric. If item is delammed, the item is no longer functional. The option for replace or credit is possible. • They don't typically repair other issues on delaminated items. If gear is no longer waterproof but you still want a patch or zipper, Patagonia might make an exception.

If an item is wearing thin, it does not have enough strength to hold stitches/fabric. A/C shirts start out very thin, they are built to be comfortable in hot weather but they do not last forever. Repairing this delicate fabric does not hold. They do not have the ability to replace zippers that are RF welded. Styles that have one side of the zipper tape sewn together with the liner in the side seam usually cannot be repaired. An example is the Fall '06 W's Down Vest (84642). • Invisible zippers in women's dresses and skirts CAN be done.

Northwall, Knifeblade, Nano Storm, Insulated Torrentshell • Pocket zippers. Patagonia does not repair • Glued seams • They cannot re-glue seams but can stitch them in most cases. For waterproof garments, seam tape will be added to maintain waterproofing.

Laundering, ironing, and drying can shorten the life of your clothes as much as wearing them does. So, follow Patagonia’s product care instructions will help make sure that your gear has a long life full of adventures.

How to Wash

Washing instructions are printed on a white tag inside our garments. Following the garment instructions will help make sure that your gear has a long, interesting life. In general, washing your gear in cold or warm water with mild powder laundry soap (non-toxic, biodegradable types preferred) and drying it on the line are the best ways to clean Patagonia products. But, check out the guidelines below or on the tag for each piece. Sometimes tumbling dry on low heat can bring the product back to life.

Down Insulation

Wash your down garment in cold water in a front-loading machine with a gentle detergent. You can find specific detergents made specifically for washing down items. Machine dry on no to low heat (may take a few cycles) with two to three clean tennis balls added to the dryer to restore fluff. DO NOT bleach, iron or use fabric softener.

PrimaLoft Insulation

Machine wash your Primaloft garment with a mild detergent on a gentle, cold-water cycle. Tumble dry on low or line dry.

Patagonia Capilene

Machine wash Capilene garments in cool to warm water with a mild, powdered laundry detergent (nontoxic, biodegradable types preferred). Line dry or tumble dry on low heat. (Line drying saves energy and reduces environmental impact).

To remove grease, first try washing the garment by hand with a good liquid dishwashing detergent, rather than machine washing it with a powdered laundry detergent. If the grease persists, rub the stain with a cotton ball or cotton cloth dampened with a few drops of denatured or isopropyl alcohol (found in the paint section of most home stores) to break up the grease, then wash as directed by the garment care tag.

Replenishing Water-Repellency

Most waterproof/breathable shells on the market are originally treated with a Durable Water-Repellant finish (DWR), which keeps the outer fabric from becoming saturated so that the breathable barrier can do its job. This coating needs to be replenished once per season, or more often if the piece gets a lot of use or washing. If water is no longer beading up on your shell, it’s time to put on another finish. Patagonia’s favorites are Grangers products, though there are many good products on the market. Whatever you choose, be sure to use a spray-on for two-layer garments (with a hanging mesh liner) or a wash-in for three-layer garments (with an interior fabric protecting the barrier). If the situation does not change, check with Patagonia and they’ll walk you through the process or take a look at your piece.

UPF Fabrics

Lacking fur, feathers or scales, we humans have to think up clever ways to protect ourselves from the sun. Products with a UPF designation provide built-in sun protection that won’t wear off.

Elements of the sun-protection strategy can range from yarn selection to fabric construction to the use of special finishes (especially for light colors). To launder fabrics with a UPF rating, simply wash in cold water and tumble dry low (or line dry to reduce environmental impact).

Stain Removal

To get grease out of a technical jacket, dampen the stain and rub in dishwashing detergent. Then wash the jacket in warm water with plenty of mild powder laundry soap. If the stain persists, sponge it with a safe cleaning fluid (Renuzit or Carbona) or mineral spirits; you can find both at your local grocery store.

To get gum or sap out of a garment, first freeze the sap with some ice, then use a dull butter knife to scrape off as much as you can. Next, soak the garment in a water/white-vinegar solution, and throw it into the laundry with warm water and detergent.

Flammability Warning

Like most synthetics, Patagonia’s shells, fleece and Capilene fabrics will melt or burn if exposed to flame or direct heat. They are not flame resistant; do not use them near ANY direct source of heat or flame.

Dry Cleaning

Given the rumpled nature of the road trips that inspire so much of our gear, Patagonia doesn’t make anything that requires dry cleaning. Our clothes are made to be worn and washed with very little fuss. More importantly, the EPA estimates that 85% of the dry cleaners in America use perchloroethylene to clean garments and textile products. This chemical solvent has significant human and environmental risks. Patagonia make clothes that wear and perform beautifully without all that.

More Patagonia Product Care Tips...

Alcohol
Denatured alcohol and isopropyl alcohol are degreasing agents that work best as spot cleaners, removing surface soils that aren’t affected by soap or detergent. Denatured alcohol and isopropyl alcohol will safely remove stains from many fabrics. Use to remove ink or sap. Do not use on acetate, rayon, wool or silk.

To remove stubborn stains, moisten a cotton ball or cotton cloth with a few drops of denatured alcohol. Test the alcohol first on an inconspicuous part of the garment and allow the fabric to dry. If there is no discoloration, wet a second cotton ball and rub the stain, but do not saturate the fabric. Allow to dry. Using a toothbrush on woven fabrics is okay, clean the stain with a drop of dishwashing detergent and scrub until the stain disappears. Rinse the garment in warm water and blot dry with a clean towel.

Ballpoint Pen
At the root of many bad days is a leaky ballpoint pen. Whisk away those heartbreaking stains with either denatured alcohol (found in the paint department of most home stores), isopropyl alcohol or lemon juice. Stubborn stains require persistence, so don’t quit after one attempt. First, test an inconspicuous part of the garment to ensure the color doesn’t change. Start by wetting a cotton ball or cloth with a few drops of alcohol or lemon juice and blotting a small area. Allow the fabric to dry. If there’s no discoloration, wet a second cotton ball and blot the stain. Use dry cotton balls to absorb the ink stain until the cotton ball no longer wicks ink from the fabric. Allow the garment to dry. Next, use a toothbrush and clean the stain with a drop of dishwashing detergent; scrub until the stain disappears. Rinse the garment in warm water, then blot dry with a clean towel.

Beer
With a few simple steps you can easily remove beer stains, and no one will know how you spent the night after you first climbed Yosemite’s Astro Man. Rub a solution of vinegar and warm water into the stain, then wash as directed by the garment care tag.

Blood
If possible, immediately rinse blood stains from fabric with cold water. Follow the rinse with an extended soak in salt water. If the blood has dried, try soaking the garment in a solution of ammonia and water before washing as directed by the garment care tag. Do not use hot water; hot water will set stain permanently.

Butter
Great on toast, not on clothes. Still, butter bloopers abound as do stain removal techniques. We like the simplest approach: Remove all excess butter and treat the stain with a grease-cutting dishwashing detergent. Launder as usual. You can also make a paste of powdered laundry detergent and water. Rub the paste on the stain, let it sit for 30 minutes, and wash as directed.

Chocolate
Chocolate goes well with most anything (we think it tastes best after a long, untracked powder run), but not with clothing. Start by scraping away as much of the stain as possible. Next, immerse the stained portion of the garment in milk or in a mixture of egg yoke and denatured alcohol for a few minutes until the stain starts to lift. Finish by washing the garment with warm soapy water.

Coffee
Coffee fuels a pre-dawn alpine start or a late night drive across Nevada, but spill it down your shirt and you’ll have a different kind of wake-up call. To remove coffee stains, start by blotting up the excess with a clean cloth. Mix a solution of one quart warm water, one-half teaspoon detergent and one tablespoon white vinegar and soak the stain for 15 minutes. Rinse well with water. Blot the stain with denatured or isopropyl alcohol and then wash in warm, soapy water.

Cotton
Wash your organic cotton gear in cool to warm water with mild laundry detergent (non-toxic, biodegradable types preferred) and dry it on the line if possible. You may also use a dryer on a low-heat setting. (Line drying saves energy and reduces environmental impact).

Fabric Conditioner
Generally we don’t recommend using fabric conditioners or softeners on our products. They can cause seam slippage in clothing with open-weave construction, and can decrease overall durability.

GORE-TEX® Fabrics
GORE-TEX® fabrics will provide optimal performance if kept clean and free from dirt, sunscreen, oils from skin and perspiration.

Machine-wash GORE-TEX® garments in warm water (104º F/40º C) using a mild powdered or liquid detergent. Make sure to rinse garments well to remove all of the detergent. Don’t use a fabric softener.

Tumble dry on a warm setting. The dryer’s warmth helps renew the fabric’s durable water repellent (DWR) finish, which keeps the outer fabric from becoming saturated in wet conditions.

If water no longer beads up on the garment, it’s time to put on another coat of DWR finish. We recommend replenishing the DWR finish once per season, or more often if the garment receives frequent use and washing. Our favorites are Grangers® products, though there are many good products on the market. Whatever you choose, be sure to use a spray-on for all garments made from GORE-TEX® fabric.

To remove grease from a garment, dampen the stain and rub in dishwashing detergent. Then wash the jacket in warm water with plenty of mild laundry detergent. If the stain persists, sponge it with a safe cleaning fluid (Renuzit® or Carbona®) or mineral spirits, which can be found at most markets or home improvement stores.

To get gum or sap off of a garment, first freeze the sap or gum with some ice, then use a dull butter knife to scrape off as much as you can. Next, soak the garment in a water/white-vinegar solution, and machine wash with warm water and detergent.

Grease
Whether you’re working in the shop or commuting on your bike every morning, there’s a good chance you and your clothes will come into contact with some type of grease.

Luckily, grease comes out of fabrics quite easily. Simply washing your garment in warm, soapy water with a liquid dishwashing detergent will usually remove the stain. If that doesn’t work, try blotting the stain with isopropyl or denatured alcohol before washing in warm, soapy water.

Gum
It keeps blown rivets from swamping your boat, patches a hole in your waterbottle and keeps your mouth moist as you launch into the crux lead. But if you get gum stuck on your clothing, it may want to stick around for awhile. You can remove it by freezing or cooling it until it hardens. Then brush or scrape the gum from the fabric. If necessary, use a cotton ball or cotton cloth moistened with a few drops of denatured or isopropyl alcohol. Wash with warm soapy water.

H2No Waterproof fabrics
It’s important to keep your H2No® garment clean for optimal performance. Wash any H2No® garment in a washing machine in warm water (104º F/40º C) using a mild detergent. Make sure you rinse the garment well to remove all of the detergent. Don’t use a fabric softener.

Tumble dry on a warm setting. The dryer’s warmth helps renew the jacket’s durable water repellent (DWR) finish, which keeps the outer fabric from becoming saturated when you’re in wet conditions.

If water no longer beads up on your garment, it’s time to put on another coat of DWR finish. We recommend replenishing the DWR finish once per season, or more often if the garment receives frequent use and washing. Our favorites are Grangers® products, though there are many good products on the market. Whatever you choose, be sure to use a spray-on for two-layer garments (with a hanging mesh liner) or a wash-in for three-layer garments (with an interior fabric protecting the barrier).

To remove grease from an H2No® jacket, dampen the stain and rub in dishwashing liquid. Then wash the jacket in warm water with plenty of mild powder laundry detergent. If the stain persists, sponge it with a safe cleaning fluid (Renuzit® or Carbona®) or mineral spirits; you can find both at your local grocery store.

Hemp
Wash any garment made from hemp in cold or warm water with mild laundry detergent (non-toxic, biodegradable types preferred) and dry it on a clothesline if possible. You may also use a dryer on a low heat setting. (Line drying saves energy and reduces environmental impact).

Ink
Whisk away those heartbreaking stains with either denatured or isopropyl alcohol or lemon juice. Start by wetting a cotton ball or cotton cloth with a few drops of alcohol or lemon juice and rubbing an inconspicuous part of the garment. Allow the fabric to dry. If there’s no discoloration, wet a second cotton ball and rub the stain, but do not over saturate the fabric. Allow to dry. Using a toothbrush, clean the stain with a drop of dishwashing detergent and scrub until the stain disappears. Rinse the garment in warm water and blot the fabric dry with a clean towel.

Ironing
In general, Patagonia garments do not require ironing. However, if you’re trying to make a good impression on “the parents” and you want to sharpen the crease down the front of your pants after an afternoon of bouldering, you should check the iron symbol on the care label of your garment first to make sure it can be safely ironed. If the iron symbol has a line through it – don’t iron. The dots on the label correspond to how much heat you should use – fewer dots mean less heat.

Having trouble deciphering the hieroglyphics on the care tag of your garment? We’ve got you covered. For a guide to the product care symbols that you may see on our clothing care tags, click here.

Merino Wool/Nylon/Polyester/Spandex Blends
We blend fibers to provide comfort, moisture-wicking, stretch and long-term durability. Fiber blends withstand wear for a long life and resist odor, so you’ll still have friends when you’ve finished your trail run.

Machine wash fabric blends in cold water and tumble dry on low temperature (or hang them out the window on the drive between Bishop and Tuolumne).

Nylon and Nylon/Spandex
Machine wash nylon garments in cool to warm water with a mild laundry detergent (nontoxic, biodegradable types preferred). Line or tumble dry on low heat.

Oil
If you find yourself under the car or truck on a long road trip for any reason, you might end up with oil in places where it doesn’t belong. Luckily, oil cleans out of fabrics quite easily. Washing your garment in warm, soapy water using a liquid detergent will usually remove the stain. If that doesn’t work, try blotting the stain with denatured or isopropyl alcohol (if the stain is stubborn) before washing in warm, soapy water.

Organic Cotton and Organic Cotton/Nylon/Spandex/Tencel® Lyocell Blends
Wash in cool to warm water with mild laundry detergent (nontoxic, biodegradable types preferred) and line dry or tumble dry on low heat.

Pine Sap
If during a road trip you find some part of yourself or your gear covered with pine sap, grab some butter patties from the coffee shop. Work the butter into your tar, resin and grease stains. The stain should scrape off once the butter has soaked into the fabric. Wash with warm, soapy water to remove the butter and voila.

Polyester
Wash polyester in warm water in a machine set to Permanent Press. Use a mild laundry soap (non-toxic, biodegradable types preferred) and line dry if possible. You may also use a dryer on a low heat setting, just make sure to remove it from the dryer quickly to prevent wrinkling.

To remove stains from polyester, try a few drops of dishwashing liquid directly on the stain and rub until the stain starts to lift. Rinse thoroughly with clean water.

Polyester Mesh
Machine wash your polyester mesh fabric in warm water on the “permanent press” setting. Use a mild powdered laundry detergent (non-toxic, biodegradable types preferred) and dry it on a clothesline if possible.

To remove stains from polyester mesh fabrics, try a few drops of dishwashing liquid directly on the stain and rub until the stain starts to lift. Rinse thoroughly with clean water.

Polyester/Nylon Blends, Polyester/Spandex Blends and Polyester/Nylon/Spandex Blends
Machine wash your polyester or polyester blend garments in warm water on the “permanent press” setting. Use a mild powdered laundry detergent (non-toxic, biodegradable types preferred) and line dry, or tumble dry on low heat. (Remove it from the dryer quickly to prevent wrinkling).

To remove stains, try a few drops of dishwashing liquid directly on the stain and rub until the stain starts to lift. Rinse thoroughly with clean water.

Polyester/Organic Cotton Blends
Wash your polyester/organic cotton blend in cool to warm water with mild laundry detergent (nontoxic, biodegradable types preferred) line dry, or tumble dry on low heat.

Red Wine
Act as quickly as possible. Apply a solution of two cups water, a tablespoon of vinegar and a tablespoon of liquid detergent. If that doesn’t work, apply a solution of hydrogen peroxide, detergent and water. Blot with a clean dry cloth. Once the stain is out, launder per garment-care label.

If the stain does not come out, pour yourself another glass of red wine and forget about it.

Washing Instructions
Washing instructions are printed on a white tag inside our garments. Following these instructions will help your gear have a long, interesting life. In general, washing your gear in cold or warm water with mild laundry detergent (nontoxic, biodegradable types preferred) and drying it on a clothesline are the best ways to clean Patagonia products.

Still confused? We’re here to help. Stop by 225 N Salem Street in Apex, NC or just give us a call at 919-267-9353.

From everyday to epic adventures, Patagonia designed the Nano Puff as a rock solid foundation for surfers, skiers, climbers, and travelers alike. Brick by iconic brick, this lightweight, versatile product is loved by all. Patagonia’s search for a synthetic insulation that met their performance and environmental standards was hard to find, but has been dialed in as PrimaLoft Gold Insulation Eco - a synthetic insulation with 55% recycled content and 100% performance.

What makes Nano Puff technology different than your average? PrimaLoft Gold Insulation Eco is lightweight, compressible, and warm - even when wet. Talk about the jacket that has it all. The insulation is so good, Patagonia trusts it through all their Nano Puff styles, including jackets, vests, and pullovers. By using a synthetic insulation that is environmentally conscious with 55% recycled content, Patagonia will save more than 2 million plastic bottles from the landfill in the first year alone. You might think this would affect its performance, but Patagonia would never let you down. The block design not only keeps the synthetic insulation in place, but also keeps the wind out. The Nano Puff has a 100% recycled polyester shell fabric that sheds moisture and glides effortlessly into your layering system, making the Nano Puff Jacket 75% recycled material. So whatever style you need to add to your closet this season, the Nano Puff will be your go to. It’s lightweight, highly compressible, easy to care for and pack during any adventure. And with 60 g PrimaLoft Gold Eco Insulation you'll continue to stay warm even when wet.

So, get ready for the season and find what type of outerwear is missing from your closet.  Shop our collection of Nano Puff jackets, vests, and pullovers from Patagonia online and instore at our shop in downtown Apex at 225 N Salem Street. If you are in the Raleigh/Durham area, our knowledgeable staff is always happy to help you find exactly what you are looking for - whether it is a gift for someone this holiday season or something new for yourself.

Ready to shop? Take a look here: http://www.shopapexoutfitter.com/collections/all/nano-puff

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